Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region. by B. E. Dahlgren

Cover of: Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region. | B. E. Dahlgren

Published by U.S. Govt. print. off. in Washington .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Plants, Edible.,
  • Poisonous plants.,
  • Botany -- Caribbean Sea.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementPrepared by B. E. Dahlgren and Paul C. Standley. Issued by the Bureau of medicine and surgery, Navy department.
ContributionsStandley, Paul Carpenter, 1884-1963., United States. Navy Dept. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQK231.C3 D3
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 102 p.
Number of Pages102
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17879577M
LC Control Number44040684

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Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region. Dahlgren, Bror Eric, ; Standley, Paul Carpenter, ; United States. Navy Dept. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Publication date. Topics. Plants, Edible, Poisonous plants, Botany.

: Edible and Poisonous Plants of the Caribbean Region, Page 69 Edible and Poisonous Plants of the Caribbean Region, United States. Navy Department. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Volume of NAVMED P: Author: Bror Eric Dahlgren: Contributor: United States.

Navy Department. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery: Publisher. This illustrated manual describes the common edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region, chiefly of Central America and the West Indies.

Designed primarily for the serviceman in the event of being separated from his unit, it provides simple tables for the ready identification of wild and cultivated fruits such as the avocado, mamey, sapodilla, cultivated roots such as cassava, dasheen, Cited by: 3.

Master location table, edible and poisonous plants 96 Index - ILLUSTRATIONS Mango (Mangifera indica). 10 Avocado (Persea americand) 11 Papaw (Carica papaya) 12 Surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora) 13 Passion vine (Passiflora ligularis). 14 Mamey (Mammea americand) 15 Sapote (Calocarpum mammosum) _ 16 Sapodilla (Achras Zapota) 17 Cashew (Anacardium occidental) 18 Star-apple (fihrysophyllum Cainito.

Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region. About this Book. Dahlgren, B. (Bror Eric), View full catalog record. Rights. Public Domain, Google-digitized. Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region. Pages; Table of Contents Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region.

Dahlgren, B. (Bror Eric), If you are generating a PDF of a journal article or book chapter, please feel. Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region. Dahlgren, B. (Bror Eric), Standley, Paul Carpenter, United States.

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery United States. Navy Dept. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Type. Book Material. Published material.

Publication info. Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region. Prepared by B. Dahlgren and Paul C. Standley. Issued by the Bureau of medicine and surgery, Navy department., Washington: U.

This book describes habitat and distribution, physical characteristics, and edible parts of wild plants—the key elements of identification.

Hugely important to the book are its color photos. There are over one hundred of them, further simplifying the identification of poisonous and edible plants. The Handbook of Edible and Poisonous Plants is a thorough review of the edible and poisonous plants, both native and naturalized, that grow in western North America.

Designed as a field-going reference manual, the Handbook provides detailed information on edible species including their scientific and common names, how to prepare them, the habitats they occupy, and their distribution in the western United s: 4.

Although this book has a very lengthy title, do not be fooled as it comes recommended by Amazon readers. This book covers plant identification through detailed drawings and photographs.

Also the lore and history of poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac are covered along with folk remedies, prevention and treatment as well as plant control.

Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants 3 General Rules for Your Safety This book is a comprehensive catalog of wild plants, mushroom, and fruit that can be consumed safely in the wild.

Wherever you’re stranded in the wilderness, and you consumed the last food you had, here are some information in case you’re feeling famished. Dictionary Of The Common Names Of Plants With List Of Foreign Plants Cultivated In The Open This book has been considered by academicians and scholars of great significance and value to literature.

This forms a part of the knowledge base for future generations. This plant is common in the Caribbean region. They stand like sentinels along the beaches, fighting erosion. The general shape varies, so it can be long with a straight trunk, or branch out wildly like the Tree of Life.

The best way of identifying the tree is by its spade-like leaves and fruit that looks like miniature apples. Edible and Poisonous Plants of the Caribbean Region (Amazon) Biodiversity Library (digital) Features: Handbook illustrations and descriptions of many poisonous and/or edible plants.

It includes common fruits, as well as uncommon uses for other parts of their plants. Valuable information on habitats and flowering/fruiting times to help ID species. Edible Leaves of the Tropics, Third Edition (Amazon). 12 Survival Edible Plants And 13 (Beautiful) Poisonous Plants To Avoid.

So you’re stranded in the wilderness and you consumed the last nub of your Granola bar two days ago. You’re feeling famished. Get yourself a good reference book for plants in your region. Make it a point to study plants that you can eat and ones you need to avoid.

Three months ago, my son and I came to live in Manzanillo, Costa Rica, a small beach town on the southern Caribbean coast. As a Western-trained herbalist, this for me has meant a daily education on an entirely new materia medica featuring herbs of the Caribbean—virtually none of my familiar temperate-climate plants thrive here!Fortunately, there are many people to learn from in the Caribe Sur.

This plant’s ability to thrive in arid environments has imbued its leaves with a saltiness that lends itself to flavouring roast Iamb, seafood, vegetable dishes, casseroles and stews. Saltbush is a hardy plant that requires little watering, and its silvery-grey foliage and pink new growth make it a distinctive, useful and low-maintenance.

The Illustrated Guide to Edible Wild Plants describes the physical characteristics, habitat and distribution, and edible parts of wild plants. With color photography throughout, this guide facilitates the identification of these plants.

Originally intended for Army use, this book Reviews: Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region by B. E Dahlgren Naval Naval hygiene Parasites Poisonous plants Poisonous snakes Poisonous snakes--Venom--Toxicology Scuba diving accidents Snakebites Snakes Surgery, (D.C.) Wild plants, Edible Zoology, Medical.

POISONOUS PLANTS Plants basically poison on contact, ingestion, or by absorption or inhalation. They cause painful skin irritations upon contact, they cause internal poisoning when eaten, and they poison through skin absorption or inhalation in respiratory system.

Many edible plants have deadly relatives and look-alikes. Poisonous plants: native and naturalized plants of Virginia with special reference to livestock poisoning.

Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Bulletin, Vol. 36, No. Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region () ().jpg 1, × 2,; KB Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region () ().jpg 2, ×. A perfect companion to your local or regional flora, the Handbook of Edible and Poisonous Plants of Western North America is packed with information on the edible and poisonous properties of plants in western North America.

Designed as a field-going reference, the Handbook provides vital information on edible species, how to prepare them, the habitats they occupy, and their distribution in the.

They are a necessity for those whose survival may depend upon a knowledge of wild plant foods. This deck of plant identification cards includes the more important edible and poisonous plants of the Eastern States. Full-color pictures combined with detaile descriptions enable the collector to identify these plants in their native habitat.

The leaves of the plant are a great source of vitamin C. If the roots of the wood sorrel are boiled, they can be eaten.

It has a flavor similar to potatoes. For further information on this and other plants, it would be advisable to buy a book that deals with the edible plants in your area, as it varies from region to region around the country. THE ILLUSTRATED GUIDE TO WILD EDIBLE PLANTS describes the physical characteristics, habitat and distribution, and edible parts of wild plants.

With color photography throughout, this guide facilitates the identification of these plants. Originally intended for Army use, this book serves as a. This book is the only one that lists all edible species (about 4, plants) that have been used as food by humans on the vast North American continent.

The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants contains a comprehensive account of each species, including etymology, geographical location, uses of each part, history of the uses, composition, medicinal uses, possible toxicity, endangered species, and much more.

Native Americans refer to them as “suicide bush!” The bush has an attractive blooming effect, and one may be tempted to try out if starving. It is among the top poisonous, edible plants known to man.

Though the poison gets concentrated in the leaves, the entire plant is toxic to both humans and animals if consumed. Make Offer - Edible Native Plants of the Rocky Mountains by Harrington, H. (Paperback) Magic and Medicine of Plants Hardcover Book Reader's Digest H1 $   Every part of the plant is edible and it grows year-round.

When the flower head is developed, it will be brown on a true cat tail. The plant has two lookalikes: the iris, which is poisonous, and the calamus, which is not.

The plants are lookalikes for a. -- By identifying dangerous organisms, this book makes life safer for those who encounter the exuberant diversity of nature in the American tropics-- Part One illustrates and describes each poisonous plant and animal in a nontechnical manner-- Part Two provides in-depth information of the toxins, symptoms, and treatments presently recorded in the scientific literature, as/5(5).

Edible and poisonous plants of Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region ediblepoisonousp00dahl Year: 25 White Sapote Casimiroa edulis The fruit of the white sapote may be eaten raw.

The me- dium-size tree with pale bark is common, wild and planted, through much of the highlands of Mexico and Central America. List of palms native to the Caribbean List of pest-repelling plants List of Pinus species List of pines by region List of plants in The English Physitian List of plants used for smoking List of plants poisonous to equines List of poisonous plants List of pollen source sources List of Quercus species List of Rhododendron species List of Rosa species.

Almond trees are poisonous from top to bottom. Even the shell surrounding the edible kernel is poisonous. The almond commonly found on the market in North America and most parts of Europe is the sweet almond, so called because the poisonous properties have been bred out of it, and it can be eaten without concern.

This book is filled with fascinating facts, recipes and stories about common plants found growing wild in northern California.

Every vacant lot, park, open space and empty field contains some of the characters in this ready to meet a variety of common weeds with uncommon stories/5(8).

Waxy leaves — Another characteristic of a poisonous plant is having waxy leaves, like a holly leaf. The purpose of this covering is to help the plant retain water. Thorns or hairs — Check the leaves and stems or stalks of a plant for thorns or fine hairs.

Stay away from these plants. Title: Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region Identifier: ediblepoisonousp00dahl Year: (s) Authors: Dahlgren, Bror Eric, ; Standley, Paul Carpenter, ; United States. pins. SOLOMON SEAL: Berries are located along the underside of the stem and are poisonous.

Shoots in the spring are edible. Rootstock are edible year round. Roots have annual stem scars (AKA SEALS) which can be used to determine the age of the plant.

Boil roots. Can be eaten raw in emergency. Only collect when abundant due to their slow growing live. poisonous plants and animals of florida and the caribbean Posted By James Michener Media TEXT ID dd0e Online PDF Ebook Epub Library publication date june 1 list price individual store prices may vary description by identifying dangerous organisms this book makes life safer for those who.

Download this stock image. Edible and poisonous plants of the Caribbean region. LOQUAT Eriobotrya japonica The plumlike loquat is usally eaten raw, but may be cooked. Before cooking, the seeds should be removed because they impart a bitter taste. This tree grows in mountainous regions.

Its elongated leaves are evergreen, its flowers are white and its fruits pale yellow and somewhat downy. The tomato, of course, is not poisonous, but the Europeans were right to be wary of it.

There are plenty of fruits, vegetables, tubers, and other plants that we heartily consume that are, secretly, dangerous to our health if prepared or eaten improperly.- This Pin was discovered by Alissa Elliott. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.

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